Coin Designs by Daniel Carr.
The earliest Astronaut dollar design is a pencil sketch. The rest are examples of the sculpting and rendering capabilities of the VS3D (Virtual Sculptor) CAD/CAM software.


Click on any thumbnail image to view a larger image.


First sketch, 1987.

In 1987, Congress was considering whether or not to issue a new US $1 circulating coin. Various proposals were considered. I submitted this sketch to members of Congress and the US Mint. I received various letters in reply, but legislation allowing a dollar coin to be produced did not pass at that time. This sketch was shown in Numismatic News in 1987.


Obverse


Reverse

Obverse: Apollo Astronaut on the moon.

Reverse: Eagle exploring the solar system.


Astronaut dollar, first virtual model, 1997.
In 1998 I began experimenting with some computer software I was writing for surface modeling. At the same time, debate over a new dollar coin was heating up. I used my software to create this virtual sculpture. I submitted it to several dozen members of Congress, the US Mint, and various publications. It was featured on the front page of Coin World.


Obverse


Reverse

Obverse: Apollo Astronaut on the moon. 13 stars represent the future colonization of space.

Reverse: Eagle and sun with 50 rays, US Treasury seal, and the US Federal Reserve seal.


Click here to see a virtual movie of the obverse twirling.

Click here to see a virtual movie of the reverse twirling.


Astronaut dollar, second virtual model, 1997.
Shortly after creating the first model, I revised it to produce this version. It was also featured on the front page of Coin World, a few weeks after the first version appeared there.


Obverse


Reverse

Obverse: Apollo Astronaut on the moon with US flag. 13 stars represent the future colonization of space.

Reverse: Eagle and sun with 50 rays.


Obv., rotated


Rev., rotated

Click here to see various circulation states of this coin.

Click here to see a time-lapse virtual movie of the obverse wearing down in circulation.

Click here to see a time-lapse virtual movie of the reverse wearing down in circulation.


Obv., proof


Rev., proof


Obv., proof, rotated


Rev., proof, rotated

Edge

50 incuse stars (alternating orientation).


Two dollar prototypes, 2000.
In 2000, Senator Phil Gramm held a symposium to discuss the state of US coinage design. I requested to make a presentation at this meeting, but no such presentations were being accepted. I was told, however, that I could send a written statement. I prepared and sent a statement which again called for the use of an Astronaut design. I prepared renderings of a possible bi-metallic $2 circulating coin of the future, similar in composition to a successful $2 coin that Canada currently has.


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